Misidentification: 4 vs. 7 (video)

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Hey again friends!  It’s been awhile, but the next Mis-ID video is done and posted!  Check out some discussion of the similarities and differences between the Individualist and Enthusiast– I bet there are more similarities that you realize! 😉

See you on the flip side for the wings of 6 video, and as always feel free to comment or reach out to me via email!

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Misidentification: 4 vs. 7 (video)

Enneagram Wings of 5

Back again with the next up wings video! This time I’m discussing the differences between 5w4 and 5w6, and how these two varieties of the Investigator are experienced differently in the world.

Check it out, and as always let me know if you have thoughts, or questions!

Enneagram Wings of 5

Enneagram Wings of 4

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Hey fellow Enneagram students!  Moving right along with the Wings series I’m running, I just posted the Wings of 4 video!  Check it out and let me know if you have any comments or questions. 🙂  I do also offer Skype consultations if you’d like more specific help in reaching a type conclusion, or troubleshooting Enneagram dynamics.  Feel free to reach out here or at Enneagramgirl@yahoo.com.

Enneagram Wings of 4

The Wings of Enneagram 3

3wings1It’s time for another wings distinction video!  I’ve been somewhat surprised by the large amount of views on these videos in particular– it seems that people really want to know more about each Enneagram type’s two main varieties!  I’m really glad to see that, honestly, as I think one of the biggest mistakes one can make with the Enneagram is to be too shallow– learning about the specific variety of a core type that you are can be very, very helpful to growth!  Especially when it comes to using our knowledge of the Enneagram to better understand and interact with others, it’s kind of big deal to get the specific nuances of our loved ones right!  Wing is a big part of that, and I’m excited to continue exploring it here.

To follow the order of my previous posts, The Achiever is up next– 3w2 vs 3w4!  Check it out, and as always let me know if you have questions or insight to share.  Final note: I realized I have been covering a lot of heart type material lately, so will be switching gears for my next Misidentification video.  You can stay tuned by following me here or on Instagram, Facebook or Youtube!

The Wings of Enneagram 3

Misidentification 2 VS 4

Aaand I’m back with a video, yay!  If you’ve ever wondered about some of the differences between the Helper and the Individualist, this is for you.  Feel free to drop me a line if you have thoughts or questions!

One thing I did want to expand a bit on, is a component that I mention in the video: 4’s Reactivity vs. 2’s Compliance.  It’s important to note that these traits are not opposites, which is why I included the graphic below in my video.

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Across the Enneagram, we see three different conflict styles: Reactive (4, 6, 8), Reframing (2, 7, 9) and Competency (1, 3, 5).  In another trait triangle, we see three different ways of interacting with the world: Aggressive (3, 7, 8), Compliant (1, 2, 6) and Withdrawn (4, 5, 9). Because these traits come in groups of three, combining them can shed a lot of insight on the differences between Enneagam types!

When we look at 2, we see that it is a Reframing and Compliant type.

When we look at 4, we see that it is a Reactive and Withdrawn type.

This gives us a spectacular example, because these types are different on both fronts!  I think I’ll have to write more on this topic in another post, and how it can be an excellent tool to prevent mistyping.  For now, I hope this helps to explain my use of these terms. 🙂

Thanks friends, see you next time as I cover the wings of The Achiever!

Misidentification 2 VS 4

Misidentification: 4 + 9

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This, like the combo before, is a pretty common confusion. Peacemakers and Individualists can behave and look very similar, even having kindred ideals. Both tend to be emotionally intuitive, deep thinkers, drawn to nature and the creative world, and usually are somewhat socially withdrawn. This surface commonality, however, is dwarfed by the inner differences between the two.

9’s are conflict averse creatures, and tend to lay low in stormy waters. 4’s on the other hand, are one of the three types dubbed reactive in the Enneagram– which means they are quick to express their viewpoint, feelings, etc.  Peacemakers are known to idealize the world and people around them, and thus can become self forgetting, neglecting their own personal development, interests and sense of self, in order to maintain peace with others. Individualists on the other hand, spend exorbitant amounts of time analyzing their feelings, identity, preferences and general inner world. These very different tendencies land 9’s and 4’s with two very different predicaments: 9’s become detached from who they are, building stubborn resentment in silence against those around them. Conversely, 4’s end up alienating those around them out of their self absorbed fixation on authentic identity.  Individualists have issues with dissatisfaction, emotional volatility and shame, where Peacemakers struggle more with issues of apathy, resentment and anxiety.

More often than not, this misidentification happens when Peacemakers mistake themselves as Individualists (not the other way around). Because their own needs, preferences and defining characteristics are often muted to 9’s, it’s easy to understand why they tend be more prone to mistyping.  It’s interesting to note also, that either potental wing for a 9 (1 or 8) has definite connections to 4 as well– making it even more probable that a 9 might mistype as a 4.

As with any type misidentification, one of the best tools to determine accuracy are the other components of type: integration when health focused, disintegration when under stress, and even wings. 4 and 9 have very different health journeys, and stress points. You can read more about them here: 4 | 9.

Have questions? Feel free to leave a comment or shoot me an email at enneagramgirl@yahoo.com, and tune in next time for my misidentification post on types 1 and 6!

Misidentification: 4 + 9

Enneagram Photo Project {Part I.}

This project is ridiculously, wonderfully imperfect. It’s one of the earliest things that struck me about it, even after just the first couple interviews. From the questions asked, to photographers, interviewers and participants, weather conditions and locations, each interview involved in this project was remarkably different from the next– but in a completely natural, and unplanned way. I’ve found in hindsight, that these differences, image by image, speak to the type in question, in many cases serving as subtle symbolism. Each detail, color, word and movement (like our selves and lives) have happened without intent on my part, but with so much purpose in the end.

As I said when I began writing this blog, this is not a sum-up of the Enneagram, nor is it a good way to learn about the types– that’s what books like The Wisdom of the Enneagram and Character and Neurosis are for. The purpose of this project rather, is to explore the nine core Enneagram types, to give them voice about their experiences, and to allow the viewer to gain insight into the nature of each type. In truth, I also hope that this project will pique individual minds about their own inner workings, and those around them– that the darkness of our sin patterns (what the Enneagram is based on) would be brought even more into the light, so that we can begin to heal and grow towards health.

To capture a fuller picture (and rather than bombarding you with all twenty seven images at once), I’ve decided to present this project a center at a time– heart, head and gut, each group containing three Enneagram types. Today, I’ll begin (in order) with the heart types: 2, 3 and 4.

A note on seeing the images closer (to read all the quotes): click the image once, which should open a new page, and then click to see the full sized image. 🙂

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The heart types have in common, themes of Identity, Shame and Worthlessness– these manifest differently for each.

2

Helpers place their identities in just that, self-sacrificially aiding and loving others. This often stems from feelings of shame, that tell them they must earn love, by loving others first and best. This of course often results in an entitled expectation of love from those that they “help”, resulting in resentment and anger. Internal message: you must love others to be loved.

You can check out my overview of 2 basics here.

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3

3’s are the most unaware of their Identity themes, because they are said to “sacrifice their heart’s desires” at a young age, in order to meet cultural expectations– an Achiever’s qualms with identity are in finding one at all.  Because they are so focused on “winning”, they often adapt themselves (their identity) in order to meet the needs of a person, or situation– so at the end of the day, they are uncertain which “mask” is really them.  All of this achievement is often rooted in a belief that they must win to be loved or accepted, with only Shame to greet them if they don’t.  Internal message: You must be the best to be loved.

You can check out my overview of 3 basics here.

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4

Individualists have a fixation with authentic Identity, and dig deeply into their own beings in order to find it. They err in believing that dark, painful things are the most real– this gives them a painfully accurate read on themselves, flaws and all, but usually leads to a disposition of shame (or feeling less). Internal message: You must be always authentic to be loved.

You can check out my overview of 4 basics here.

As always, feel free to reach out with questions or comments, and be sure to tune in for head types (5, 6 and 7) tomorrow! 🙂 I’d love for you to share this project, but please do not use the images without my express consent. Thanks!

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So much thanks to all of my awesome participants, and friends who helped with interviewing! Photo credit for 1, 2, 4 and 7 goes to the lovely Jamie Gray, while 6 and 9 are the work of Tony Au. All quotes are the words of my participants, and the writing/artwork is my own. Thanks everyone, I couldn’t have pulled it off without you!

Enneagram Photo Project {Part I.}